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Reviews

 

The Shape-Shifting Serpent

Aanmitaagzi draws from an historic Anishinaabe story to narrate contemporary issues By Molly Johnson Serpent People Presented by Coleman, Lemieux & Compagnie

Serpent People, takes its inspiration from an historic Anishinaabe story, The Black Sturgeon of Nipissing. While this story is an Anishinaabe one, the performers are artists from a range of communities, nations, clans and ancestries. The ensemble is appealingly egalitarian, a cast of varying ages, identities and skill sets who together create an image of real community – people working together across differences. The mythology of the serpent as shape-shifter and realm-crosser that Serpent People draws on is apparent in these artists, who shift from scene to scene adapting to fulfill roles foreign and familiar.

 

Impressions from Montréal’s Festival TransAmériques - Part II

Three works from Mette Ingvartsen, Jocelyne Montpetit and Rachid Ouramdane By Mark Mann

Mini-reviews of works in Montréal’s Festival TranAmériques (FTA) - Ingvartsen’s 7 Pleasures, Montpetit’s Runaway Girl and Ouramdane’s Tordre. Part two of two of The Dance Current’s FTA 2017 coverage.

 

Impressions from Montréal's Festival TransAmériques - Part I

Three works from Frédérick Gravel, Manuel Roque and Eszter Salamon By Philip Szporer

Mini-reviews of works in Montréal’s Festival TranAmériques (FTA) - Gravel’s Some Hope for the Bastards, Roque’s bang bang and Salamon’s Monument 0: Haunted by the War (1913-2013). Part one of two of The Dance Current’s FTA 2017 coverage.

 

Dancers in Denim

Mile Zero Dance explores Edmonton’s historic Great Western Garment Company By Fawnda Mithrush Anything Goes: GWG Dance in 17 Parts

Part sound installation, part multidisciplinary performance, part massive pile of denim, Edmonton’s Mile Zero Dance presents a work inspired by the Great Western Garment Company, which, after many decades of storied success, finally shut its doors in 2004.

 

All About Giselle

Giselle by Coastal City Ballet By Brittany Duggan

First staged in 1841, Giselle is often thought of as a straightforward story ballet. Vancouver-based Coastal City Ballet, a repertory company founded in 2011, stuck closely to the very specific and illustrative music by French composer Adolphe Adam, and choreographer Irene Schneider does an impressive job of working with the score to create scenes that challenge the various levels of dance ability within the company.

 

Through the Microscope

Lesley Telford's Spooky Action at a Distance By Naomi Brand Spooky Action at a Distance

In Lesley Telford’s latest creation, Spooky Action at a Distance, she draws from subject matter that is well served by the complex spatial patterns and temporal relationships of a group of young, moving bodies. The piece is an interdisciplinary collaboration with poet Barbara Adler.

Molly McDermott in the work Kai Kairos, by Barbara Bourget and Jay Hirabayashi / Photo by Peter Eastwood
 

Diverse Expertise

Vancouver International Dance Festival By Andrea Rabinovitch Vancouver International Dance Festival 2017

Vancouver International Dance Festival (VIDF) aims to grow appreciation for culturally diverse dance. In this review - works by Margaret Grenier, Karen Jamieson and Molly McDermott, as well as international company Dairakudakan.

Milton Lim and Michelle Lui in Room 2048 by Hong Kong Exile / Photo by Remi Theriault
 

The Cathartic Future

Room 2048 by Hong Kong Exile By Charlotte Priest Hong Kong Exile Room 2048

Room 2048 by Vancouver’s Hong Kong Exile fuses dance and theatre to create a disorienting future world.

Cas Public in Hélène Blackburn's 9 / Photo by Damian Siqueiros
 

Sign and Sound

Cas Public presents 9 By Mark Mann 9

Cas Public traverses worlds of sound through sign in 9.

Sylvain Émard in his own work Le chant des sirènes / Photo by Sylvie-Ann Paré
 

An Enduring Presence

By Philip Szporer The Song of the Sirens Sylvain Émard

Sylvain Émard returns to the stage after a fifteen-year absence with a new work that highlights his continued mastery of a soft and vulnerable onstage presence.

Andrew Tay in Make Banana Cry by Tay and Stephen Thompson / Photo by Claudia Chan Tak
 

Slippery Identities

By Helen Simard Make Banana Cry

In their new work, Make Banana Cry, Andrew Tay and Stephen Thompson tease and out the tensions between identities and stereotypes in the layers and performance of Asian-ness in western society.

Vinod Para and Xi Yi in Hari Krishnan's Holy Cow(s)! / Photo by Miles Brokenshire
 

Toppling Taboos by Taking On Sacred Cows

Holy Cow(s)! by Hari Krishnan By Aparita Bhandari Holy Cow(s)!

Hari Krishnan has always challenged simplistic notions of tradition. His latest work, Holy Cow(s)!, attempts to break up what Krishnan calls “false binaries”, informed by news headlines around the election of Donald Trump and stereotypes that Krishnan has had to deal with all his life.

Carmen Romero with Alejandro Céspedes in her work Jacinto / Photo by Vanessa Guillen
 

Delving into Familial Pasts

Jacinto by Carmen Romero By Kathleen Smith Jacinto Carmen Romero, produced by Compañia Carmen Romero

Flamenco artist Carmen Romero captures the memory and mystery surrounding her father’s sudden death in Jacinto. Dripping with sadness while exploring movement that is capable of vast expression and infinite consolation, Jacinto situates Romero as part of an experimental new wave that is sweeping flamenco internationally.

Malar Varatharaja, Kate Holden, Nova Bhattacharya, Atri Nundy and Molly Johnson in Bhattacharya’s work Infinite Storms / Photo by John Lauener Photography
 

Dancing Through Migraines and Other Pains

Infinite Storms by Nova Dance By Aparita Bhandari Infinite Storms

These are times in which we need to bear witness. The impetus for Nova Bhattacharya’s latest work, Infinite Storms, came from her experience living with migraines yet speaks to a greater, universal suffering. How do we persevere through pain?

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