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Reviews

 

Sleek Statements 

Reclusive Conclusions and other duets Tedd Robinson

The world premiere of Tedd Robinson’s production Reclusive Conclusions and other duets is definitely one of the highlights of dance in the nation’s capital this season. In a break from his self-labelled “reclusive existence” as a solo artist, the Ottawa-based Robinson choreographed three duets for himself and guest artists Mako Kawano, Louise Lecavalier and Margie Gillis. 

 

Dancing, Death & Narcissism 

By Philip Szporer Monsieur Estelle Clareton

Estelle Clareton, one of Québec’s up-and-coming choreographers, sets up an inspired theatrical premise early on in her new work, “Monsieur”, the first in a planned triptych focussing on men.

 

Deconstruct/Disconnect 

By Lindsay Zier-Vogel The King and Queen of Ruins, In Good Company Sasha Ivanochko, Lesandra Dodson, Shannon Cooney

Through short reviews and poetry, I have charted my experiences of DanceWorks’ double bill, The King and Queen of Ruins/In Good Company, performed at the duMaurier Theatre Centre in Toronto from March 13th-15th and featuring the work of choreographers Sasha Ivanochko, Lesandra Dodson and Shannon Cooney. 

 

Martial Arts Meets Sea Shanty 

By Kaija Pepper Cyclops battery opera, Lee Su-Feh, David McIntosh

“Cyclops” is a loose compilation of myths and imagery about the sea, created by battery opera co-directors Lee Su-Feh and David McIntosh.  

 

Blurred Bodies, Bionic Bodies 

By Philip Szporer Amelia Édouard Lock, La La La Human Steps

“Amelia” is one of the most anticipated dance productions of the season. After a much-ballyhoued European tour, and a stop in Ottawa at the National Arts Centre for the Canadian premiere, Édouard Lock’s La La La Human Steps opened the Festival Montréal En Lumière.

A (re)View of "Quest" 

Quest Byron Chief-Moon, Karen Jamieson

This review was submitted in response to the postings below by Lindsay Zier-Vogel, who is exploring the integration of poetry into her writing about dance. See this author’s response to Zier-Vogel’s writing under the “Of Wishes and Driftwood” link. 

 

A Personal View of Humanity 

Beauty Julia Sasso

Every so often an artist makes a definitive work – one that encapsulates his or her vision of the nature of humanity and the world. Such provocative works stimulate discussion that resonates beyond the particulars of the work itself. 

 

A Bazaar of Impressions 

By Philip Szporer Schatje George Stamos

George Stamos is the kind of choreographer that can’t make tidy dances, but that’s not to say he doesn’t use his material judiciously. In “Schatje” (the affectionate Dutch word “honey”, which, according to Stamos, is used by gays, prostitutes and drag queens), he’s feeding on club and strip joint behaviour in a theatrical setting, and everything and everyone is open to scrutiny – the manipulator and the manipulated, the subject/object and the viewer/viewed.

 

Peggy Baker's "Home" Season 

By Kathleen Smith Home Peggy Baker Dance Projects

If home is where the heart is, dancer/choreographer Peggy Baker’s domestic turf must surely encompass the entire planet – Baker can wear her heart on her sleeve like no other performer.

Of Wishes and Driftwood 

By Lindsay Zier-Vogel Snakes in my Belly Nicole Fougère

A poetic response.

 

Juxtaposition 

By Kathleen Smith Converse, Virgin Queen Toronto Dance Theatre, Peter Chin, Matjash Mrozewski

Compare and contrast. The recent Toronto Dance Theatre double bill of premieres by Toronto choreographers Peter Chin and Matjash Mrozewski provided a rare opportunity to get analytical about two very different approaches to dance. 

 

Still-Life Inspires Motion 

By Philip Szporer elles Louise Bédard

Choreographer Louise Bédard’s deep respect for Modotti has inspired her new production, “elles”.

people : life 

By Lindsay Zier-Vogel Channel 3: Glass Anchor, Idle Heidi Strauss, Justine Chambers

More poetic responses to motion. 

 

Transformations 

Jing Ju/The Secrets Unveiled & Circle of Sacred  William Lau, Dancers for Peace, Sashar Zarif

It never ceases to amaze me that dancers I know well sometimes change in performance to become beings I barely recognize. They animate space, suspend time and grow larger than life. Their bodies can speak, sing, fly or hold perfectly still.  

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